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SAVE Newsletters

Frontline Employee Newsletter, May 2022

Featured in this issue:

  • Protect Your Back in Construction Work
  • Match Your Exercise Program with Healthy Changes
  • Will Pooling Finances Aid Relationship Health?
  • Where Fentanyl Is Found
  • Learn to De-escalate Conflict in Relationships
  • May is Mental Health Awareness Month. . . Is My Family Member Mentally Ill?
  • Avoid the Top Three Career Regrets
  • Try This: To-Do List Tip

Previous Issues of
Frontline Employee Newsletter

Featured in this issue:

  • New Calorie Restriction Diet Rage
  • Stay Focused on Your New Path if Downsized
  • Free Cool Apps: Ourgroceries.com
  • Cyberbullying in the Workplace
  • Stress Awareness Month… Psychological Effects of War
  • You’re a Sales Representative (No Matter What You Do)
  • Getting Your Work-Life Groove Back
  • Doing a Great Reset as a Couple

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Featured in this issue:

  • Stopping Rumors in the Workplace
  • Back to Face-to-Face Communication
  • Make Your Clique a Positive Force
  • Stress Management Skill: “Planning”
  • Avoid the Term “High-Functioning Depression”
  • Find a Hidden Networking Group to Boost Your Career
  • Early-Stage Alcoholism Virtually Unnoticeable
  • Early Birds Might Be More Productive

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Featured in this issue:

  • Keep Teen Dating Safe
  • Off-Load Worry for Improved Performance
  • Reduce Customer Service Stress with Accurate Empathy
  • Managing Grief in the Era of COVID-19
  • Learn to Love Exercise
  • Workplace Stress Management: Interpersonal Demands
  • Not Ready for Addiction Treatment?
  • Training Reduces Risk of Injury

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Featured in this issue:

  • Ghosting at Work (Abandoning Communication)
  • Avoid “Procrastination with Awareness”
  • Is Your Team Too “Teamy”
  • Seek Support Early in a Crisis
  • Facing an Anniversary of a Traumatic Event
  • Getting Help for Post-Holiday Financial Stress
  • Maintaining Morale in the Hybrid Workplace
  • When Worry Wakes You Up

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Featured in this issue:

  • Best Tips Success with New Year’s Resolutions
  • Teaching Children to Reach Out for Help
  • Try the Advanced Heart Attack Risk Calculator
  • Foods That Slow Down Alcohol Absorption
  • Managing the Stress of Holiday Expectations
  • Relentlessly Bullied, but No One Knew It
  • Stay Healthy Working from Home
  • Apps that rescue You from Lost Time

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Featured in this issue:

  • How to Be Energized by Stress
  • Human Interaction with Plans Reduces Stress
  • Thinking about Alcoholism Treatment
  • Delta-8 THC (Just Don’t Use It!)
  • Support for Military Families
  • Recapture Your Energy after Work
  • Making Seasonal Family Gatherings More Joyous
  • Helping Someone Seek Help for a Mental Illness

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Frontline Supervisor Newsletter, May 2022

Featured in this issue:

  • I was discussing my employee’s attendance problem when she mentioned that family issues were causing her lateness. She added that she would be contacting SAVE. I look forward to positive changes, but should I have done anything more?
  • Is a “constructive confrontation” with an employee an interview that always includes mention of some potential disciplinary action to help motivate the worker to feel more urgency about making changes in performance?
  • I have been a department head overseeing dozens of other supervisors for many years. I think many don’t see all the benefits that come with managing a more complete relationship with a worker beyond simple concerns about work output. What benefits accrue from more engaged relationships with employees?
  • My department manager just informed me that one of my employees went over my head to complain. It made me look bad, and, frankly, I am upset. How should I intervene? The concern is related to a disagreement we are having about her job description. My boss hasn’t said anything about the end-run. 
  • What can supervisors do to help their employees correct performance more efficiently? I have often met with employees to discuss problems that need fixing, but I have later been surprised by what’s been forgotten or not understood despite what appeared to be a well-communicated meeting!

Previous Issues of
Frontline Supervisor Newsletter

Featured in this issue:

  • I do not always provide an accurate rating of my employee’s performance. I tend to grade higher than what is deserved. My purpose is to avoid conflict and the sourcing of the relationship, which I depend on to get work done. What am I risking with this practice?
  • My employee went to SAVE. She is a domestic abuse victim, and there are legal, financial, and child custody issues that she is dealing with. She is off work right now. I want her to take all the time she needs, but how long should I wait? What’s fair? What is SAVE’s role?
  • What are the most important steps for supervisors and mangers in helping to prevent workplace bullying?
  • I am a new supervisor. What are some important tips to follow, mistakes to avoid, and considerations to think about to help keep me on track to becoming an effective manager and leader?
  • On several occasions over the past year, I was told that my documentation about an employee incident was not good enough to support disciplinary action for the employee. Needless to say, I am frustrated. What are the most important issues in documentation for supervisors?
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Featured in this issue:

  • Urine drug testing is part of our comprehensive drug-free workplace program. I know that a test will tell us whether indeed someone is positive and what drug they are using, but will it also prove they were impaired? My employee insists he was not impaired. 
  • My employee apologizes constantly for her inadequate performance. I know she is sincere, but I feel a bit guilty putting pressure on her and taking some action that could cause her to lose her job. She wont go to SAVE. I feel torn. I am more frustrated with myself than with her!
  • My employee participated in a court-mandated driver education course related to drug use after a recent DUI arrest. The court did not refer him to treatment, and I disagree with that decision. I think he’s an alcoholic, because frankly, I am recovering myself. Can I involve SAVE?
  • SAVE has been a wonderful service for our organization. Many employees have been helped, and it is a great resource for our supervisors. I’ve noticed not all supervisors use SAVE equally. Other than simply lack of training, why might some be resistant?
  • What is the “Lone Ranger Syndrome” that is sometimes used to describe supervisors and how they conduct themselves in their role?

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Featured in this issue:

  • We recently participated in a presentation on stress management, and a few employees who attended the presentation openly stated that they planned to visit SAVE. It was a great presentation, but I was surprised at the number of stressed workers. Should I be concerned? Should I ask SAVE how I can help?
  • If a tragedy occurs in the workplace and the employees are emotionally affected, what signs and symptoms should I look for later (following any counseling and “psychological first-aid” employees receive) so I can be supportive and encourage self-referral to SAVE?
  • People criticize my messy desk. It’s quite a joke in the office. I don’t feel that I am bullied, and I haven’t been lectured by management or experienced any adverse actions, but am I a bad manager because my desk is messy and looks completely disorganized?
  • I have known my employee for many years and am quite familiar with her personal problems. Does this create an exception in terms of not being given more specific information about the nature of her issues discussed with SAVE?
  • Can I phone SAVE to find out if an employee I suggested attend the program showed? More specifically, if the employee was in fact never seen, can SAVE say so?

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  • Is it appropriate for a supervisor to raise mental health issues with employees, such as pointing out that an employee “looks stressed out”? This might prompt employees to consider using SAVE.
  • My employee made a group of coworkers aware of communication problems she was having with her husband. One employee gave her the name and phone number of a marriage counselor. I was a little uncomfortable with this process. Should I have discouraged this exchange and recommend SAVE instead?
  • What are the costs of misconduct in the workplace, and what are the dominant behaviors constituting misconduct?
  • Over the years, I have noticed that the most difficult and troubled employees also offer the most resistance to supervisor referrals to SAVE. A few have actually agreed to go to counseling, but not to SAVE. Is it okay to accept the employee’s alternative source of help?
  • I have always struggled with being assertive. As a new supervisor, I can imagine some problems this might cause. Are there any problems outside my awareness that I should be careful to avoid?

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Featured in this issue:

  • How do I document an attitude problem so there is no uncertainty later about what I mean? What really bothers me most is the cynicism, eye rolling, and sighing.
  • What reason do supervisors give for why they did not refer a troubled employee to SAVE following a tragic incident in the workplace where there were signs and symptoms clearly present?
  • I am a new supervisor. What supervisory skills can SAVE best help me develop if I get into situations or experience problems I can’t manage properly?
  • What is the best way to develop loyalty among staff? I have respect from employees, and I respect them. I feel that , but loyalty is something more. How is it defined, and how do I get it?
  • Is bickering a problem I should refer to SAVE? I have a few employees in our small office, and they seem to get on each other’s nerves quite a bit. They don’t complain about it, and they are great performers. Personally, however, I don’t like the tension.

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Featured in this issue:

  • I am the manager of a library in a large city. Periodically, people living on the street wander in and may behave in disturbing ways. One threw a book on the floor recently and screamed at it. It was upsetting. One employee took a “sick day” afterwards. Can SAVE help us manage this sort of stress?
  • Is there research that points to marijuana’s adverse effect on productivity in the workplace? Most people know about the impact of alcoholic workers and the high costs associated with alcohol abuse. Cannabis does not seem to have the same amount or degree of information.
  • I think most employees don’t like hearing negative feedback, even if they are sitting calmly and listening to it. This awareness, in my opinion, causes supervisors to avoid giving feedback or even avoiding annal reviews. This is not fair to employees. Any tips for this problem?
  • Why does enabling of alcoholic employees happen even if coworkers are well-educated about these behaviors? Everyone in our company has had alcohol and drug awareness training. Enabling was thoroughly discussed. A few of my colleagues socialize with those they know are alcoholics but say nothing. 
  • Our company engages in a lot of after-hours socializing. It’s part of our work culture. Customers are always included. Drinking and a bit of rowdiness are not unusual. I’m nervous about sexual harassment. Not incident has occurred, but I would like to prevent one from ever happening. Any tips?

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Health and Wellness Tip Sheets

SAVE Employee Assistance Program
A program of the Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse

PO Box 28
Santa Barbara, CA 93101
www.cadasb.org

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For more information about SAVE, or to get a quote on any of our services or trainings, please contact:

Victoria Rightmire
SAVE Program Director
email: vrightmire@cadasb.org
805.962.5387