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SAVE Newsletters

Frontline Employee Newsletter, October 2021

Featured in this issue:

  • Principles of Emotional Wellness
  • Doctrine of Completed Staff Work
  • Get a Mental Boost With Decluttering
  • Working at Home Hazards
  • National News, Crisis and Effects on Children
  • Intervening with “Nomophobia”
  • Good Samaritan Laws and Overdose Rescue
  • The COVID-19 Stress Scale

Previous Issues of
Frontline Employee Newsletter

Featured in this issue:

  • Supporting Employees Who Have Chronic Pain
  • Suicide Prevention Month
  • While Waiting for your Therapy Appointment
  • Activities and Risks of COVID-19 Infection
  • Workaholic: Myths that mess with  Mental Health
  • Becoming A Resilient Employee
  • When you’re a First Time Manager
  • Brain Challenging Activities May Delay Dementia

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Featured in this issue:

  • Facing Personal Change
  • Take Micro-breaks to Empower Productivity
  • Teens and Video Gaming Addiction
  • Ostracized at Work?
  • Practice Cheerfulness to Find Job Passion
  • Power of Internal Customer Service
  • Just This Much Fentanyl Is Fatal

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Featured in this issue:

  • Develop the Habit of Active Listening
  • Can Exercise Prevent the Worst of COVID-19 Illness?
  • Caregiving Apps Make It Easier
  • Finding Your Emotional Intelligence Gap
  • Equity in the Workplace: Whats Your Role?
  • Morning Grogginess? Try Avoiding the Snooze Button
  • Diagnosing Compulsive Buying-Spending Disorder
  •  New Stress of Going Back to Work

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Featured in this issue:

  • This is a change
  • Have a Burnout Prevention Plan
  • Keep Safety in Your Summer
  • Please, Report Sexual Harrassment
  • Race-Based Traumatic Stress
  • Pandemic and Prolonged Grief
  • Leadership Skills Can Be Learned
  • Parental Tips: Reducing Dating Violence

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Featured in this issue:

  • Mental Health Awareness Month: What’s Normal, What’s Not?
  • Not Enough Feedback?
  • Time for Stroke Awareness
  • Stop Procrastinating with the Five-Second Rule
  • Be a Self-starter to Attract More Opportunity
  • Witnessing Death and Injury in the Workplace
  • Do You Have “Smiling Depression?”
  • Your First Back to Work Team Meeting

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Featured in this issue:

  • Helping First Responders: Peer Influence and Suicide Prevention
  • Good First Impressions: Like a Bit of Insurance
  • Dozing at Your Desk?
  • Does Diet Affect Mental Health?
  • Do I Need Professional Counseling?
  • “ePresenteeism”: A Risk for Remote Workers
  • Customer Service Tip: Stop the Stress Before It Starts
  • Coping with Next Day Anxiety

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Frontline Supervisor Newsletter, October 2021

Featured in this issue:

  • If a SAVE referral is not a punitive program, who do employees become resistant to formal supervisor referral for job performance issues?
  • I am not sure I buy the argument that the opioid addiction epidemic is strictly due to so much supply by pharmaceutical companies. Opioid addicts I’ve know (at least a couple of employees over the years) were also alcoholics. What’s the connection, and why don’t we hear more about this?
  • I supervise a diverse group of workers from around the world. Many, I think, would not visit SAVE for counseling help. How can I better motivate these workers, whose culture may discourage sharing personal problems with others, to consider using SAVE?
  • I have two very smart employees who are constantly in conflict with each other. I hesitate to refer them to SAVE to resolve their issues because I think they will manipulate the SAVE professional, who may not be a match for their ability to manipulate. Should I refer anyway? 
  • Can supervisors consult with SAVE about other things related to our role as a supervisor, even if the subject has nothing to do with managing a troubled employee?

Previous Issues of
Frontline Supervisor Newsletter

Featured in this issue:

  • I notice some firefighters are resistant to self-referral so SAVE. Confidentiality concerns a few, but others think asking for help will tarnish their macho image. How can I help reduce this resistance?
  • There are hundreds of resources on becoming a better supervisor, but who has time to read this stuff and incorporate it into one’s supervision style? I think supervisors often must muddle through with trial and error until we learn how to be supervisors, right?
  • What is “upward bullying”?
  • At a Memorial Day party I saw my DOT employee at a distance smoking a joint. He has a regulated, safety-sensitive position. I pretended not to notice, but now that I am back at work, I must act on our policy and refer to testing. I fear this is going to cause quite an upset.
  • I have referred my employee to SAVE, but he says he won’t go because his neighbors work in the same office building and he might get spotted, thereby losing his confidentiality. This sounds like a good excuse. What can I do to persuade him to go?

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Featured in this Issue:

  • SAVE helps employees with personal and professions challenges and protects the bottom line of the company by reducing absenteeism and costs, including those related to workers’ compensation. But what about improved morale? How does one put a dollarsand-cents measure on it so SAVE gets credit?
  • My employee injured his foot playing soccer over the weekend. The story is suspect, but he is on crutches and wants to avoid lifting for a few weeks. I asked for a doctor’s note, but honestly, it looks fake. Does SAVE get involved in situations like this? Our small company doesn’t have policies or procedures.
  • When an employee seeks help from SAVE, how is it different from counseling services offered in the community by a therapist
    in private practice?
  • Many personal problems are very difficult to overcome. Addiction is one of them. How does SAVE help employees with this illness if a client only self-refers because of some trouble or symptom related to the addiction? People in total denial are going to pay attention only to an immediate fix, right?
  •  Please offer a few important tips, perhaps including a few of the most overlooked, supervisors should consider when making a referral to SAVE.

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Featured in this Issue:

  • My employee’s father died of COVID-19 last fall, and there was no real funeral. She appears depressed, and some days not very functional. Friends are worried because she was previously treated for drug addiction and is now drinking. How should I approach a SAVE referral?
  • Complaints and problems that employees seem to “drop on my desk” are the part of my job that I like least of all. Sometimes I snap at employees when they walk in and “deliver” me problems. How do I better manage this process for less stress and so I feel like the boss, not a support desk?
  • SAVE helps resolve personal problems such as stress, depression, workplace conflicts, and substance abuse. What about SAVE’s ability to teach critical skills, like better listening? That’s what my boss recently said I should consider improving.
  • My employee is a hothead, but most of us are used to it. When does anger become a performance issue?
  • Can SAVE sit with me and my employee to serve as a mediator in a conflict we are having about performance, strategy, and my expectations for what needs
    to be done in her position?

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Featured in this Issue:

  • I notice some firefighters are resistant to self-referral to SAVE. Confidentiality concerns a few, but others think asking
    for help will tarnish their macho image. How can I help reduce this resistance?
  • There are hundreds of resources on becoming a better supervisor, but who has time read this stuff and incorporate it into one’s supervision style? I think supervisors
    often must muddle through with trial and
    error until we learn how to be supervisors, right?
  • What is “upward bullying”?
  • At a Memorial Day party I saw my DOT employee at a distance smoking a joint.
    He has a regulated, safety-sensitive position. I pretended not to notice, but
    now that I am back at work, I must act on our policy and refer to testing. I fear this is going to cause quite an upset.
  • I referred my employee to SAVE, but he says he won’t go because his neighbors
    work in the same office building and he might get spotted, thereby losing his
    confidentiality. This sounds like a good excuse. What can I do to persuade him to
    go?

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Featured in this issue:

  • During supervisor training for drug and alcohol awareness, I discovered that I am probably an alcoholic. (Actually, I have suspected it for years.) I have referred many employees to SAVE, so I feel too embarrassed to bring my own problem to them. Should I seek help elsewhere?
  • When I make a formal referral to SAVE, should I try to reduce the tension associated with constructive confrontation by having the meeting outside of my office? Would the employee’s office be better, or perhaps a quiet spot in a more neutral area?
  • Can I ask SAVE to give me an opinion on the likely impact of a certain type of disciplinary action on an employee’s psychology? My concern is that the employee might “go off” and become violent.
  • We referred our employee to SAVE on a supervisory referral because of behavior and attendance problems. He entered detox at a hospital, but the rumor is that he was discharged from treatment for conduct problems. He wants to come back to work. How should we proceed? What is the role of SAVE?
  • I have a superstar employee. He earns outstanding performance evaluations yearly. My concern is his gambling. After hours, he reportedly plays poker. I’ve heard that there is a lot of domestic conflict as well. Is it improper for me to comment, inquire, intervene, or involve myself in this situation?

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Featured in this issue:

  • Our management team is concerned about an employee’s absenteeism. We filled out the supervisory referral form and the release of information form signed by the employee which gives SAVE permission to notify us when the employee has scheduled the first session. We now know that the employee has become a client. We’re taking a wait-and-see approach because he just recently got help. Should we be skeptical?
  • No supervisor wants to shortchange an employee who divulges a serious personal problem by not offering some advice. I think most supervisors are good listeners and problem solvers; otherwise, we would not be leading others. Still, how can we show support but still refer an employee to SAVE?
  • I understand that presenteeism is the practice of employees coming to work while sick or adversely affected by emotional distress. What about employees who work remotely? What can supervisors do to help them, and do they have the same issues?
  • I need to be more self-confident. I don’t know if it is a learned trait or a natural part of one’s temperament, but can SAVE help? Also, how does acting and feeling confident influence the work unit?
  • I recommended my employee visit SAVE to resolve problems with a roommate whose partying and disruptive behavior are causing the worker to come in late nearly every day. This was not a formal referral, but how long should I wait to see changes in the [employee’s] attendance?

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Health and Wellness Tip Sheets

Visit our library of tips sheets for health and wellness in the workplace and in your personal life. Download a variety of helpful articles to decrease stress in your life and deal with challenging situations in the workplace. 

SAVE Employee Assistance Program
A program of the Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse

PO Box 28
Santa Barbara, CA 93101
www.cadasb.org

For more information about SAVE, or to get a quote on any of our services or trainings, please contact:

Victoria Rightmire
SAVE Program Director
email: vrightmire@cadasb.org
805.962.5387