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SAVE Newsletters

Frontline Employee Newsletter, May 2021

Featured in this issue:

  • Mental Health Awareness Month: What’s Normal, What’s Not?
  • Not Enough Feedback?
  • Time for Stroke Awareness
  • Stop Procrastinating with the Five-Second Rule
  • Be a Self-starter to Attract More Opportunity
  • Witnessing Death and Injury in the Workplace
  • Do You Have “Smiling Depression?”
  • Your First Back to Work Team Meeting

Previous Issues of
Frontline Employee Newsletter

Featured in this issue:
  • Helping First Responders: Peer Influence and Suicide Prevention
  • Good First Impressions: Like a Bit of Insurance
  • Dozing at Your Desk?
  • Does Diet Affect Mental Health?
  • Do I Need Professional Counseling?
  • “ePresenteeism”: A Risk for Remote Workers
  • Customer Service Tip: Stop the Stress Before It Starts
  • Coping with Next Day Anxiety
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Featured in this issue:
  • On-the-Job Accident Prevention: “Law of Large Numbers”
  • Do You Live with a Problem Gambler?
  • Thinking about Quitting Your Job?
  • Supporting a Partner with Anxiety
  • Time Management: Finding Time Nuggets
  • Presenteeism: Working While Sick
  • Overcoming the Impact of COVID-19 Lockdown
  • How to Feel More Secure about Your Job
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Frontline Employee Newsletter, February 2021

Featured in this issue:

  • Group Therapy Power
  • Edible Cannabis Products: How Much Do You Know?
  • Language That Empowers Workplace Diversity
  • Men—It’s Okay to Talk about Your Feelings
  • Getting Out of a Couples Rut
  • Don’t Give Up on Your Goal
  • Opioids in Construction Trades
  • How to Help Someone Stop Smoking

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Featured in this issue:

  • New to Customer Service by Phone?
  • Use a Site Blocker When Self-Discipline Fails
  • Yes, That’s Stalking
  • Being Positive May Reduce Memory Decline
  • Make Your Goals Happen in 2021
  • Your Stress Management “Urgency Kit”
  • Are You Glamorizing Overwork?
  • Have a Workplace Injury-Free Year

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Featured in this issue:

  • Tips for Post-Election Holiday Gathering
  • COVID-19 Prevention Tip: Mouthwash
  • Yes, That’s Emotional Abuse
  • Pandemic Pain and Young People
  • National Impaired Driving Awareness Month
  • Helping A Loved One Cope with Chronic Pain
  • SAVE Can Do That!
  • Alone, In a Relationship

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Featured in this issue:

  • Don’t Forget Flu Season
  • Hidden Stress Hazards of Remote Workers
  • Should You Lend Money to a Coworker?
  • Boredom and the Pandemic
  • National Caregivers Month
  • Leading a Meeting with Impact
  • Thanksgiving Safety—Yes, It Is Possible
  • Alcohol and Prescription Drugs Don’t Mix

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Frontline Supervisor Newsletter, May 2021

Featured in this issue:

  • During supervisor training for drug and alcohol awareness, I discovered that I am probably an alcoholic. (Actually, I have suspected it for years.) I have referred many employees to SAVE, so I feel too embarrassed to bring my own problem to them. Should I seek help elsewhere?
  • When I make a formal referral to SAVE, should I try to reduce the tension associated with constructive confrontation by having the meeting outside of my office? Would the employee’s office be better, or perhaps a quiet spot in a more neutral area?
  • Can I ask SAVE to give me an opinion on the likely impact of a certain type of disciplinary action on an employee’s psychology? My concern is that the employee might “go off” and become violent.
  • We referred our employee to SAVE on a supervisory referral because of behavior and attendance problems. He entered detox at a hospital, but the rumor is that he was discharged from treatment for conduct problems. He wants to come back to work. How should we proceed? What is the role of SAVE?
  • I have a superstar employee. He earns outstanding performance evaluations yearly. My concern is his gambling. After hours, he reportedly plays poker. I’ve heard that there is a lot of domestic conflict as well. Is it improper for me to comment, inquire, intervene, or involve myself in this situation?

Previous Issues of
Frontline Supervisor Newsletter

Featured in this issue:

  • Our management team is concerned about an employee’s absenteeism. We filled out the supervisory referral form and the release of information form signed by the employee which gives SAVE permission to notify us when the employee has scheduled the first session. We now know that the employee has become a client. We’re taking a wait-and-see approach because he just recently got help. Should we be skeptical?
  • No supervisor wants to shortchange an employee who divulges a serious personal problem by not offering some advice. I think most supervisors are good listeners and problem solvers; otherwise, we would not be leading others. Still, how can we show support but still refer an employee to SAVE?
  • I understand that presenteeism is the practice of employees coming to work while sick or adversely affected by emotional distress. What about employees who work remotely? What can supervisors do to help them, and do they have the same issues?
  • I need to be more self-confident. I don’t know if it is a learned trait or a natural part of one’s temperament, but can SAVE help? Also, how does acting and feeling confident influence the work unit?
  • I recommended my employee visit SAVE to resolve problems with a roommate whose partying and disruptive behavior are causing the worker to come in late nearly every day. This was not a formal referral, but how long should I wait to see changes in the [employee’s] attendance?

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Featured in this issue:

  • What is meant by the term equitable workplace? Is this a new abstract idea, or is it something that can be clearly defined with a business rationale? What is the supervisor’s role in an equitable workplace?
  • I was sitting in a supervisor training discussing constructive confrontation and referral of troubled employees to SAVE. I understand how to do it, but to be honest, I have always been afraid of confronting employees. So I don’t. How can I overcome this fear?
  • I want to show maximum respect to my employees rather than overlook important ways to demonstrate that I value their expertise. I know this will build morale and enhance my relationship with them. So, what are the areas of interaction with them that I should consider?
  • I referred my employee to SAVE because of attitude problems. The referral went well, but later the employee shared untrue information with peers about our discussion that prompted the referral. I’d love to rebut what was said, but it would be improper. Do I have any options?
  • Our company treats all employees with respect, and we strive for an equitable workplace. Still, I don’t see any research that says older workers and younger workers are equal in every respect with regard to strength, stress management, thought processes, etc.

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Frontline Supervisor Newsletter, February 2021

Featured in this issue:

  • Periodically, I see articles about empathy and supervisors. The dictionary defines empathy as the “ability to understand and share the feelings of another.” Why is this so important?
  • I don’t visually observe my employees since many of them are now working remotely. I would like to keep an eye open for signs of stress, but how is this done without seeing attendance, interpersonal behaviors, or attitude problems?
  • I referred my employee to SAVE, and the employee was very cooperative. The next day, I discovered he checked into a psychiatric unit for acute depression but did not go through SAVE. I am surprised, but happy he got help. Should I work with the hospital directly or get SAVE involved in some way?
  • I referred an employee to SAVE, and he phoned the next day to say he was taking a two-week vacation recommended by a therapist to whom he was referred. Would SAVE override our work rules to permit time off? I can’t afford to have him out.
  • I heard from a friend that construction workers have a high rate of suicide. Is this true? What does the literature say? I work in this industry, but haven’t been aware of this before.

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Featured in this issue:

  • I don’t believe I am a bullying supervisor, but several employees recently complained about my supervision style as being such. I think the whole idea of bullying is nearly “fad-like” and an opportunity for employees to escape responsibility for have subpar performance. Am I correct?
  • I have a new employee with whom I don’t get along. The chemistry or temperament between us isn’t right, and I’m afraid down the road that we are going to have conflicts. Can SAVE help?
  • My employee, an extremely bright computer scientist, is facing administrative actions related to a poor decision regarding ethical behavior. How can SAVE help, or can it?
  • Should I refer an employee to SAVE if he or she tests positive for COVID-19?
  • Why is SAVE considered a means to help supervisors manage stress? Does this refer to our self-referral to the program to help ourselves or does this refer to the mechanics of SAVE and how it removes the burden of managing difficult or troubling employee behavior?

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Featured in this issue:

  • Some states recently decriminalized the psilocybin mushroom, and it appears authorities in these states will practically ignore its use and possession. What is psilocybin? What are some signs and symptoms of its use?
  • Which is more effective as a means of identifying substance abusers: spotting signs and symptoms of addiction or focusing on performance issues like absenteeism and conduct problems that may be caused by substance abuse?
  • My employee has been late too often over the past several months. I mentioned it to him several times in passing, and then I wrote him up and referred him to SAVE in the memo. What is my next step?
  • If I phone SAVE to provide information concerning a rumor I heard about an employee who was recently discharged from treatment and may be using again, will SAVE keep my phone call confidential? How will this information be used?
  • How do I document a bad attitude? It is too subjective. I would almost need a video of the person’s actions in order to accurately describe it.

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Featured in this issue:

  • This year has been difficult for many employees. No one has gotten sick with COVID-19, but I have noticed lower levels of excitement among workers about their jobs and less engagement, meaning they aren’t as passionate, innovative and initiating as they used to be. Is the pandemic to blame?
  • I have a friend who is also a supervisor. He says it’s the supervisor’s job to help employees to correct performance, not SAVE. My friend also has an alcohol problem. Most of us know it. Could there be a connection between his awareness of an alcohol problem and avoidance of SAVE?
  • What is the definition of reasonable suspicion? How do I know if what I am calling reasonable suspicion will later be upheld by a review or investigation of my role?
  • Should I expect an employee to act offended if they are referred to SAVE?
  • I am frustrated with my employee because I have suggested he get help at SAVE for whatever is going on in his life to resolve his attendance issues. Despite my dozen or so recommendations, he hasn’t gone. What is the next best step to take?

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Health and Wellness Tip Sheets

Visit our library of tips sheets for health and wellness in the workplace and in your personal life. Download a variety of helpful articles to decrease stress in your life and deal with challenging situations in the workplace. 

SAVE Employee Assistance Program
A program of the Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse

PO Box 28
Santa Barbara, CA 93101
www.cadasb.org

For more information about SAVE, or to get a quote on any of our services or trainings, please contact:

Victoria Rightmire
SAVE Program Director
email: vrightmire@cadasb.org
805.962.5387